Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.
Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: BASICS OF HACKING

  
Bookmark and Share
  1. #1
    Administrator eLLusIoNisT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    INDIA
    Age
    28
    Posts
    702
    Blog Entries
    6
    Rep Power
    10

    Question BASICS OF HACKING

    Getting Ip data from various sources

    Introduction
    Getting the local machine's name
    RAS machines using some sort of dialup
    Network machines
    Using the DHCP VxD to get the IP address and the DNS server data
    Using WsControl() to get the IP address
    Author
    Legalese
    Copyright


    Introduction
    ------------

    This document describes several ways to get TCP/IP specific data under
    Windows 95+. Information was provided by George Foot, Jacob Verhoeks,
    Arthur Hoogervorst and several whacky programs by Alfons Hoogervorst.

    Basic information required to get for TCP/IP:

    o The local machine's name

    o The local machine's IP address(es)

    o The IP addresses of DNS servers

    Sample source code (in C), that demonstrate the techniques described in this
    document, are available on request.

    This document refers seevral times to the Windows registry and to VxDs. If
    you want to use the registry and to call VxDs from within DOS programs
    (running under Windows), also check out
    < Dear member\guest you have to reply to see the link > (delete
    the usual no.spam from the URL).


    Getting the local machine's name
    --------------------------------

    You can get the computer's name by getting the ASCIIZ string from the
    following key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\
    System\
    CurrentControlSet\
    Control\
    ComputerName\
    ComputerName\
    ComputerName = ASCIIZ string of max. 64 characters.

    Several Windows TCP/IP programs use the computer name in host names, for
    example Eudora. However, the returned ASCIIZ string doesn't have to be
    "DNS compliant", i.e. it may have white space and other characters that
    are invalid in host names.

    Alternatively, you can find the "real" machine name by getting the current
    IP address, and using gethostbyaddr().


    RAS machines using some sort of dialup
    --------------------------------------

    The RAS dialup adapter stores TCP/IP settings in a "phone book entry". For
    Windows 95, this phone book is stored in the registry. To get the relevant
    addresses, you need to follow these steps:

    1. Check if there's a RAS connection active (optional):

    Read DWORD value of the following key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\
    System\
    CurrentControlSet\
    Services\
    RemoteAccess\
    Remote Connection = DWORD

    If the returned DWORD has value 1, there's a RAS connection


    2. Get the name of the current RAS phone book:

    Read an ASCIIZ string from the following key:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\
    RemoteAccess\
    Default = ASCIIZ string for the active phone book

    The returned string should be used in the next step.


    3. Get the RAS settings using the "phone book name". Note that you should
    first get the size for the settings buffer (using the Registry API).

    Read binary data from the following key:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\
    RemoteAccess\
    Profile\
    "phone book name" = BINARY data of max. 50 bytes

    "phone book name" is the name of the phone book retrieved in step 3.


    4. The byte at offset 0x04 in the retrieved data buffer has several flags
    set for available TCP/IP data.

    If bit one (0x01) is set, the user set a fixed IP address for the
    current RAS connection. This fixed IP address (in host order) can
    be found at offset 0x08.

    If bit two (0x02) is set, the user specified one or two DNS addresses.
    The DNS addresses are in host order, and can be found at offset 0x0C
    and offset 0x10. Note: 0.0.0.0 (0x0UL) is an invalid (unspecified) DNS
    address.

    History:

    I had most of the registry functions working (for DOS programs running
    under Windows 3.1 and 95), and also found the appropriate RAS connection
    key. I didn't find the necessary IP data, and told this to Jacob Verhoeks.
    The next day he came up with a full and detailed description of the binary
    data stored under the RemoteAccess\Profile tree.


    Network machines
    ----------------

    For network machines too the data is stored in the registry. Here are the
    steps to retrieve the current IP address and the DNS IP addresses.

    1. The current active adapter's IP address can be found in the following key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\
    System\
    CurrentControlSet\
    Services\
    Class\
    NetTrans\
    0000\
    IPAddress = ASCIIZ string

    This ASCIIZ string has the dotted name IP address.

    Note: Presumably Windows 95 stores multiple interfaces in the NetTrans
    key. Ideally you should enumerate each of them, and check whether any
    of them has an "IPAddress" key.

    2. The current IP addresses of DNS servers can be found in the following
    key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\
    System\
    CurrentControlSet\
    Services\
    VxD\
    MSTCP\
    NameServer = ASCIIZ string

    This key stores DNS IP addresses in a comma-separated list.


    History:

    I hadn't worked for a long time on DosSock95 when George Foot referred
    me to a .FIX file and sent me the info about the IP address. Both
    George Foot and Jacob Verhoeks provided the key which stores the name
    server information.


    Using the DHCP VxD to get the IP address and the DNS server data
    ----------------------------------------------------------------

    For RAS connections, there's an alternate way to get the IP address and
    DNS server addresses. This only works with RAS connections.

    First get the entry point of the DHCP VxD (which has ID 0x49A). Call the
    entry point with (E)AX set to 1, ES:BX set to a buffer receiving DHCP data,
    and (E)CX with the size of the buffer. If the buffer is smaller than the
    data available, AX will be set to 111 (Win32 error: ERROR_BUFFER_OVERFLOW)
    and the first DWORD in the buffer will contain the size of the DHCP data.

    Here's how the information looks like:

    Offset Type What

    0x0000 WORD Number of IP addresses
    0x000C DWORD IP addresses in host order
    0x0020 WORD Total number of bytes in server addresses. Divide by
    four to get the number of server addresses.
    0x0024 WORD Offset (from begin of data) to server addresses.

    History:

    This information was found while stepping through the WinSock code.
    Don't try this at home (in a sense: do it actually at home).


    Using WsControl() to get the IP address
    ---------------------------------------

    WsControl() is an undocumented function found in both the 16 bit and the
    32 bit WinSock DLLs of Microsoft. Many people already suspected that
    WsControl() returns very useful data, because it's used by the Windows 95
    WINIPCFG tool. The problem is that it's an undocumented function: you won't
    hear anything of it from Microsoft... In short: the following information may
    be highly platform dependent, and extremely unportable. Food for the hacking
    minded proper. Here's what I found out (and I'd appreciate any comments if
    you find other things about WsControl).

    The WsControl() function looks like this:

    DWORD WsControl(DWORD Protocol, DWORD Action,
    LPVOID CommandBuffer, LPDWORD CommandBufferSize,
    LPVOID ResultBuffer, LPDWORD ResultBufferSize);

    For TCP/IP Protocol should be set to IPPROTO_TCP and/or IPPROTO_UDP. Other
    protocol values result in the expected WSA error "unsupported protocol".

    The only value of Action I encountered was 0, which seems to mean something
    like "Get Information". I believe that passing a value of 1 would send
    something like "Set Information" to WinSock; but I must admit that I didn't
    try this. (For obvious reasons ofcourse. If you happen to have a lot of
    money, consider donating money to me, so I can buy a test machine. Smile

    CommandBuffer has a buffer with a command that's sent to WinSock,
    CommandBufferSize points to a DWORD with the size of the CommandBuffer.

    On return of the function, ResultBuffer will have data returned by WsControl
    for the command in CommandBuffer. The DWORD pointed to by ResultBufferSize
    should have the size of ResultBuffer on function call, and has the number
    of bytes written to ResultBuffer on function return.


    CommandBuffer
    -------------

    The Command buffer is a structure of 36 bytes. It may look like this; names
    are mine, yours may be better.


    #pragma pack(1)
    typedef struct
    {
    DWORD Number; /* Interface number, WS_INTERFACE_TCPIP for TCPIP */
    DWORD Unknown; /* Seems to be used to differentiate between
    * multiple TCPIP interfaces. */
    } WS_INTERFACE, FAR* LPWS_INTERFACE, NEAR* NPWS_INTERFACE, * PWS_INTERFACE;

    typedef struct
    {
    WS_INTERFACE Interface; /* Interfaces to query??? */

    DWORD What; /* Changes for each request */
    DWORD Unknown; /* Seems to be always 0x100??? */
    DWORD Command; /* Obviously a command */

    BYTE Unknown1[16]; /* Unknown (Always 0???) */
    } WS_IN_PARAMS, FAR* LPWS_IN_PARAMS, NEAR* NPWS_IN_PARAMS, * PWS_IN_PARAMS;
    #pragma pack()

    The first two DWORDs in the WS_IN_PARAMS structure (the CommandBuffer) have
    a number for what I call an "interface". In Windows 95 lingo you can call
    it an adapter. For the TCP/IP interface, the Interface should have a value
    of 0x0301, with possibly some other value for the most significant DWORD
    (little endian: xxxx xxxx 0000 0301).

    Just to clarify the above phrase: when Windows searches
    for an TCP/IP interface, it loops while checking for the
    DWORD 0x00000301.

    The What member seems to change for each WsControl request, and probably
    "browses" deeper into the hierarchy of data available through WsControl.

    The Command member has a number which seem to correspond with a command.


    Available Commands
    ------------------

    Here's what I found about commands. Note that the naming of the commands
    are mine; yours may be better.


    Get List Of Interfaces
    ----------------------

    Interface = 0
    What = 0x100
    Unknown = 0x100
    Command = 0
    Unknown1[] = 0

    Returns several quad words (4 words, 2 dwords) with all the interfaces
    available for use in WsControl.

    The interface number for TCP/IP is 0x0301 (with the Unknown dword
    possibly set to differentiate between multiple TCP/IP interfaces).

    Example output:

    0000: 00 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 01 04 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0010: 01 03 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 80 03 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0020: 80 02 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 02 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0030: 00 02 00 00 01 00 00 00

    The quadword at offset 0x10 has the first (and only) TCP/IP interface.
    Incidently, the quadword at 0x30 is related to the loopback adapter,
    the quadword at 0x28 to the PPP adapter.


    Acknowledge Valid Interface (Get Version??? Is Current???)
    ----------------------------------------------------------

    Interface = Valid Interface
    What = 0x100
    Unknown = 0x100
    Command = 0x1
    Unknown1[] = 0

    To acknowledge the interface in Interface, send the above command.
    The result buffer should return a DWORD with a special value.

    For example, the interface number for TCP/IP is 0x0301. If you set
    Interface to 0000 0000 0000 0301, the returned DWORD will contain
    0x0303. Presumably, the special value returned is related to the
    HIBYTE of the interface number.

    Note that the ResultBufferSize will NOT have the number of bytes written
    to the buffer. This seems to be a bug - or perhaps it's just the way
    this command is supposed to work. Your guess may be better.

    Example output:

    0000: 03 03 00 00

    The above output is for the TCP/IP interface.


    Get Interface Information
    -------------------------

    Interface = Valid Interface
    What = 0x200
    Unknown = 0x100
    Command = 0x1
    Unknown1[] = 0

    This command returns several data which may or may not be useful at all.

    For TCP/IP the DWORD at offset 0x54 has the number of IP addresses
    active for the TCP/IP interface. To get specific IP address information,
    use the Get Active Address Information.

    For TCP/IP the DWORD at offset 0x58 has the number of IP address related
    information structures. To get the information, use the Get Extended Active
    Address Information.

    Example Output:

    For TCP/IP:

    0000: 02 00 00 00 80 00 00 00 - EA 01 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0010: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0020: EA 01 00 00 66 01 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0030: 00 00 00 00 3C 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0040: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0050: 02 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 - 07 00 00 00

    The DWORD at offset 0x54 has the number of structures returned by
    the Get Active Address Information command. The DWORD at offset
    0x58 has the number of structures returned by the Get Extended
    Active Address command.


    Get Extended Active Address Information
    ---------------------------------------

    Interface = Valid Interface
    What = 0x200
    Unknown = 0x100
    Command = 0x101
    Unknown1[] = 0

    For TCP/IP this command returns data with an unknown structure. It
    seems to list network masks.

    Example output:

    For TCP/IP see output below. Note that the size of each structure is
    0x150 / 0x07.

    0000: E0 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 - 01 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF
    0010: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF - C3 AD E4 8E 03 00 00 00
    0020: 02 00 00 00 38 00 00 00 - E0 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF
    0030: 00 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 - 01 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF
    0040: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF - C3 AD E4 8E 03 00 00 00
    0050: 02 00 00 00 38 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF
    0060: C3 AD E4 8E 01 00 00 00 - 01 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF
    0070: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF - 7F 00 00 01 03 00 00 00
    0080: 02 00 00 00 38 00 00 00 - FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
    0090: C3 AD E4 FF 02 00 00 00 - 01 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF
    00A0: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF - C3 AD E4 8E 03 00 00 00
    00B0: 02 00 00 00 38 00 00 00 - FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
    00C0: C3 AD E4 00 02 00 00 00 - 01 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF
    00D0: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF - C3 AD E4 8E 03 00 00 00
    00E0: 02 00 00 00 38 00 00 00 - FF FF FF 00 FF FF FF FF
    00F0: FF FF FF FF 02 00 00 00 - 01 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF
    0100: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF - C3 AD E4 8E 03 00 00 00
    0110: 02 00 00 00 BB 2B 00 00 - FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
    0120: 7F 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 - 01 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF
    0130: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF - 7F 00 00 01 03 00 00 00
    0140: 02 00 00 00 BC 2B 00 00 - FF 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF


    Get Active Address Information
    ------------------------------

    Interface = Valid Interface
    What = 0x200
    Unknown = 0x100
    Command = 0x102
    Unknown1[] = 0

    For TCP/IP this command returns data which is partly understood. The
    first four bytes in each structure have active IP addresses.

    Example output:

    For TCP/IP see output below. Note that the size of each structure is
    0x30 / 0x02.

    0000: C3 AD E4 8E 02 00 00 00 - FF FF FF 00 01 00 00 00
    0010: FF FF 00 00 01 00 00 C0 - 7F 00 00 01 01 00 00 00
    0020: FF 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 - FF FF 00 00 00 00 00 C0

    As you can see, the first DWORD has the current IP address
    (195.173.228.142). The first DWORD in the second structure has the
    loopback address of 127.0.0.1, which was active at that time.

    Author
    ------

    Written by Alfons Hoogervorst. He can be contacted at
    <alfonsAThoogervorstDOTdemonDOTnl>.

    If you have additional information about any of the topics in this document,
    especially about WsControl(), send me a note. Comments, suggestions, and
    any useful hints are welcome too.

    Alfons works as a freelance developer, specializing in low-level programming.


    Legalese
    --------

    You're allowed to distribute this file for free, without paying me any fee.
    However, the following sections should remain unmodified in this document:

    Introduction, Author, Legalese, Copyright.

    The information in this document is provided AS IS, without any warranties
    or guarantees. As a human being, he expressedly reserves his rights to err:
    "If its meaning doesn't manifest, then: put it to rest!"
    PLEASE DONATE TO SUPPORT GEEKWORLD......


    Follow The Rules Or Get Banned
    Bind@sKhol LInk Directory

  2. # ADS
    Circuit advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Age
    2010
    Posts
    Many
     

  3. #2

    Default

    Good info............

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. 23 Best Hacking Videos
    By eLLusIoNisT in forum ETHICAL HACKING & SECURITY TOOLS
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-08-2009, 05:39 AM
  2. Hacking hotmail, the basics
    By DaMysterious in forum ETHICAL HACKING & SECURITY TOOLS
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-24-2009, 05:13 PM
  3. OvEr 180+ Of Hacking Tuts!!!
    By singh9211 in forum ETHICAL HACKING & SECURITY TOOLS
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-24-2009, 05:03 PM
  4. Best Hacking Tools - 85 in 1 - Must Have
    By singh9211 in forum ETHICAL HACKING & SECURITY TOOLS
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-24-2009, 04:56 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •